Cosplayer’s Religious Family Kicked Her Out Of The House Over Cosplay; Church Continues to Harass Her

It is both shocking & saddening to see a fundamentalist religious family kick their granddaughter out of the house because she’s a #cosplayer.

Lady Iredell (her real name was withheld due to ongoing church harassment) found friendship & belonging within the #cosplay & #costuming communities when she first discovered the hobby in 2015. Once forced to make her #costumes in secret late at night and keeping them hidden while living with her family, she now lives with a friend; but the harassment continues from the church that most of her family continues to attend.

Lady Iredell said that the church often encourages families to shun family members who leave the church. Since she left, Lady Iredell has not been allowed to speak with her younger brother and church members have visited her apartment trying to pressure her into returning even though she hadn’t told anyone where she was living. (Lady Iredell’s landlord had passed information about her whereabouts to her family.)

Costuming & cosplay are artistic forms of expression. Freedom of expression is the driving force behind the hobby. We sincerely hope that Lady Iredell will be able to continue to improve her life and to live to life as she chooses.

We wish Lady Iredell all the best and encourage those in the costuming & cosplay communities who know her to help her if she ever needs it.

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Original Film-Worn “Iron Man” Costume Missing

The Los Angeles Police Department (#LAPD) is investigating the disappearance of an original #IronMan #costume worn by Robert Downy, Jr. in the 2008 movie. The missing costume is valued to be worth $325,000.

The costume is believed to have disappeared sometime between February and April of this year from a prop storage warehouse located in Pacoima, California. It was first reported missing on Tuesday, May 8, 2018, though it’s not immediately clear who first reported the theft.

Marvel referred questions about the missing costume to Walt Disney Studios, but Disney has not yet issued a statement.

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Public Perceptions of Costumers, Cosplayers & Furries: Who’s Responsible?

All #costumers, #cosplayers & #furries share one common responsibility: public perception. That public perception applies to the fandom(s) being represented by costumers, cosplayers & furries; the perceived reason(s) why costumers, cosplayers & furries dress up in #costumes; and (most importantly) the types of activities that costumers, cosplayers & furries engage in while in costume.

Any time that costumers, cosplayers or furries are in costume in a public space, members of the general public who are not costumers, cosplayers or furries themselves will also be present and they will be able to observe what the costumers, cosplayers or furries are doing while they are in costume. A public space could be a public park, a city street, a convention center, a hotel lobby, etc.

Who are the members of the general public? They are, in all likelihood, a combination of adults and underaged children. Also, members of the general public are going to be a cross-section of society itself, which includes a myriad of beliefs, as well as a myriad of ethical, moral and political points of view.

While there will always be a wide variances in the points of view that different people have, there are also going to be some points of view that are probably going to be commonly held by most people when they pertain to intimate behaviors between people who are in a public space and how acceptable those intimate behaviors are.

  • Some types of intimate behaviors that are likely going to be regarded by most people as being acceptable while in a public space include a couple holding hands; family members or friends hugging each other; someone kissing another on the cheek; a brief kiss on the lips between adults; etc.
  • Some types of intimate behaviors that are more likely going to be regarded by most people as being unacceptable while in a public space include very long passionate kisses on the lips; physical contact that is more than a simply embracing or hugging; touching parts of the body that are never shown while in a public space; etc. At this level, these types of intimate behaviors can cross over to being regarded as sexual; and anything construed to being a sexual activity or imitating a sexual activity while in a public space is probably not going to be an acceptable behavior.

Let’s ask a question: what may happen if people (the ‘participants) are observed by others (the ‘observers’) while they are actively participating in unacceptable intimate or sexual behaviors while in a public space?

Obviously, many (if not most) of the observers are going to quickly develop a very poor opinion of the participants. But it doesn’t end there: if the participants are identified as being part of a specific group, there’s a good chance that many of the observers are also going to associate other members of that same group with that behavior, then apply the same poor opinion to other group members even though they weren’t involved. It also won’t necessarily matter if the group as a whole doesn’t condone that type of unacceptable public behavior: they’ll still bear the burden of that low opinion caused by the actions of a few.

Now, let’s take this up a notch. We live in a very interconnected society thanks to the Internet and smart phones that include cameras capable of taking both pictures and videos. If an observer takes out his or her smart phone and takes pictures or or video of the participants as they are actively engaged in an unacceptable public behavior, then that observer shares those pictures or video on the Internet, what’s going to happen? Within a matter of seconds the total number of observers will increase from a handful of people to potentially millions of people.

As we have discussed in past posts, some costumers & cosplayers are members of costume clubs; and many costume clubs have written charters that include codes of conduct that define specific types of behaviors that are not acceptable for costume club members to engage in while in costume or otherwise representing the club. Why? To maintain a positive public perception of the costume club and its members. Members who engage in an activity that violates the costume club’s code of conduct face potential punishment that could include suspension from the club or even banishment.

Similarly, many businesses and corporations require their employees to take annual training in order to prevent the employees from engaging in behavior that could potentially cause a negative public perception of the company,  which could undermine the company’s bottom line: it’s ability to conduct business and make money. If an employee violates a company’s policies, he or she may be suspended, be put on probation or possibly be terminated.

So, who then bears the responsibility of public perception in the costuming, cosplay & furry communities? We all do!!!

Are there any examples of what could go wrong when one or more costumers, cosplayers or furries engages in unacceptable behaviors while in a public space? Unfortunately, yes; and the most recent occurrence that we are aware occurred at “Furry Weekend Atlanta” (FWA) two weeks ago. Ironically, our previous post was about the dance contest that occurred at FWA.

2 weeks ago, 2 individuals (presumably men) dressed as human pups (by wearing what is typically viewed as being fetish attire) started to play with each other as puppies in the hotel lobby where FWA was occurring. The 2 individuals wrestled with each other and then one got on top of the other and remained there for roughly 30 seconds, which gave the appearance that some sexual stimulation was occurring in that position. As these 2 individuals were engaged in this actively, other furries were walking by, as well as members of the general public. Then, one of the FWA attendees who was on a balcony overlooking the lobby took video of the 2 individuals and did what? Posted an edited video emphasizing the 30-second period when one of them was on top of the other onto their personal Twitter feed. The backlash was immediate and includes an unflattering article in a well-known British publication.

We learned about this incident from the World of Rooview YouTube channel:

One very important distinction that Roo points out is the difference between fursuiting and the adult activity known as “pup play”:

  • Fursuiting is the creation of anthropomorphic characters through costuming. Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities, including animals and animal characters.
  • “Pup play” is an adult activity in which one or more humans behave like a puppy. It is a type of zoomorphism, which is the attribution of animal behaviors and characteristics to humans (or other things). Thus, it is the opposite of anthropomorphism.

While the 2 “pup play” participants that were publicly wrestling with each other in the hotel lobby were not wearing fursuits at the time they were filmed, there is a presumption that they were also FWA attendees because they were wearing fetish pup play attire. Whether or not they were actually FWA attendees, they’re costumes associated them with FWA, other furries in attendance and the broader furry community at large. Had these 2 individuals only engaged in this activity in a more private location (such as their hotel room or some other site away from FWA) then this would not have become an issue. Also, had the person who filmed their questionable public activity taken their concerns to an FWA representative instead of posting it online for millions of people to see, then this would not now be associating FWA or the furry community as a whole due to the actions of only 2 participants.

Our request here is simple: if you are in costume in a public space, please do not engage in behavior that could be deemed as sexual, imitating sexual activity or be otherwise interpreted as being inappropriate or unacceptable in a public setting. Because if you do, it can reflect poorly on everyone in the hobby.

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Wil Wheaton Wore a “Star Trek” Costume to See “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Life imitated art Thursday (Dec. 14, 2017) when actor Wil Wheaton wore a #StarTrek #costume to a screening of “#StarWarsVIII: #TheLastJedi”! He also tweeted about it:

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Wil Wheaton dressed in a “Star Trek” costume at a “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” screening.

Wil Wheaton & friends at the “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” screening.

Wil Wheaton, who starred as Wesley Crusher in “Star Trek: #TheNextGeneration”, appears as himself regularly in the long-running sitcom #BigBangTheory, in which he did wear a “Star Trek” costume to a screening of “Star Wars VII: #TheForceAwakens”.

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$5000 Stolen from “Walking Dead” Cosplayer in New Jersey

$5000 was stolen from a professional #WalkingDead #cosplayer while at the Walker Stalker Con in Edison, NJ. The money was inside a cash box where cosplayer Cecil Garner kept his money earned while taking photos with fans on “Walking Dead” character Rick Grimes.

“It was devastating,” said Garner, who left his job as a banker in 2016 to become a professional cosplayer. Edison police are investigating and have reviewed security cameras from the convention hall.

A gofundme has been set up for Garner to help him recover from the loss.  So far over $2600 has been raised.

Anyone with information about this theft is urged to contact the Edison, NJ police department.

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Beware: Halloween Costumes Could Give You Head Lice

Shopping for a new #Halloween #costume or just trying on #costumes at stores? Head wear (such as wigs, masks & hats) could have lice! Doctors often see a rise in reported cases of head lice at this time of year because people trying on costumes in stores could have head lice, which can then be transferred to other people.

We recommend the following advice to avoid possibility of being exposed to head lice when trying on costumes in stores:

  • Never try on a mask in a store without wearing a bathing cap over your hair.
  • Put a new costume into a tightly sealed plastic bag for at least 48 hours before wearing it to kill off any lice that may be on it.
  • Place dryer-friendly costumes into a dryer for 45 minutes before wearing them.

 

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DragonCon: 2 Women Injured by Chairs Thrown from the 10th Floor at the Marriott Atlanta Marquis Hotel; Police Are Investigating

Atlanta police are investigating the incident at #DragonCon where 2 women were injured when chairs were thrown from the 10th floor of the Marriott Atlanta Marquis Hotel onto people below. Both women were hospitalized and released, but it was a very frightening experience for both.

One of the victims, Kelly McDaniel, was walking in a first floor area of the hotel when one of the chairs hit her on the head. She then felt blood pouring down her face. She believes that her #costume hat (she was dressed as Loki from the #Avengers) reduced the severity of the injury.

The Director of Media Relations for DragonCon released the following statement:

“Two women at Dragon Con were injured at the convention early Sunday morning when two chairs were dropped from an outside balcony on the 10th floor in the Marriott to a landing below. The women were treated and released at separate hospitals.

We are grateful that the injuries were not more severe.  And we are proud of the Dragon Con attendees who stepped up quickly, realized the severity of the situation and provided immediate assistance.

Atlanta Police Department is investigating.”

The hotel management also said that they would be taking steps to ensure that this doesn’t happen again in the future.

We again urge anyone with knowledge of who threw the chairs from the 10th floor of the Marriott Hotel at DragonCon to contact the Atlanta Police Department.

Kelly McDaniel

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