Not All Costumes Are Finished

This graphic accurately describes what happens to a lot of #costumes & #cosplays while they’re in the #WIP (work-in-progress) mode: they never get finished and are eventually abandoned.

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Work-In-Progress

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DIY: How to Construct A Metal Helmet (Video Tutorial)

For those #costumers & #cosplayers who like metal, here’s a video tutorial of how to make a metal helmet as presented by David Guyton (who provides templates). This is an advanced type of #costuming that requires experience with metal working technique known as “sinking”:

Sinking, also known as doming, dishing or dapping, is a metalworking technique whereby flat sheet metal is formed into a non-flat object by hammering it into a concave indentation.

LED’s and some knowledge of electronics is also needed.

Rare Spider-Man Costume Found Hidden in Closet for 50 Years

A rare #SpiderMan #costume that was hidden in a NYC closet for 50 years was found! Originally commissioned by #Marvel to a seamstress to be used in a Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade along with several other costumes was never seen because the hired actors got drunk the night before the parade and never showed up.

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This very rare costume, believed to have been made circa 1964-1965, was displayed by the table of Roy Thomas, co-creator of Marvel’s Wolverine and Iron Fist, at the Big Apple Con yesterday and will likely be auctioned.

The costume (along with the others created) has a crude, DIY quality and (for some inexplicable reason) a bit off-model with a purple tights. “I can only assume they didn’t give the seamstress enough money,” Roy Thomas joked. The costume had been hidden in one of his closets.

Reference to original article: This rare Spider-Man costume was hidden in a closet for 50 years.

Real-life Costumed Crime-fighter “The Black Widow” Patrols Norfolk, VA

DJ turned real-life #costumed crime-fighter named “The Black Widow” in homemade masked #costume patrols the streets of Norfolk, VA using his martial arts skills. Inspired by Marvel’s character #SpiderMan, this masked avenger (who uses an alias) said he was inspired to take up the role after being bullied as a child. He told one local TV station, “I stopped fights in some of the bars around here. I stopped carjackings in dormant areas. I stopped a woman from being assaulted.”

Among the various types of #costumers, being a real-life #costumed crime-fighter isn’t new, but very uncommon. Good luck to “The Black Widow”.

“Star Wars” Stormtrooper Costumes Banned by Princeton Reunion Committee: Seriously?

Graduates from #Princeton’s 2012 class will not be allowed to attend a #StarWars-themed party in #Stormtrooper #costumes due to unfounded fears that it will convey a racist message. In other words, one of the most iconic and most recognized science fiction costumes from the “Star Wars” franchise won’t be permitted because the name “stormtrooper” was derived from soldiers so-named from Nazi Germany.

The organizers of the 2012 Princeton graduating class reunion should consider learning that there is a vast difference between “Star Wars” and Nazi Germany. While Nazi Germany committed many heinous crimes against humanity, “Star Wars” is purely science fiction that never happened. Also, while events from World War II were part of the inspiration for “Star Wars” and its characters (as created by George Lucas), there is absolutely no connection between “Star Wars” and any form of past or current racism that occurred any where on the planet Earth.

We are genuinely shocked that a plastic costume worn by characters from science fiction that don’t actually exist and (therefore) never actually harmed anyone, would be banned due to unproven claims of racism caused by these non-existent characters.

Let’s consider other places where individuals wearing “Star Wars” stormtrooper costumes may be seen:

  • Since Disney theme parks are now filled with actors wearing stormtrooper costumes of various types, is Disney promoting racism or harming anyone? Absolutely not.
  • Are the 10,000+ members of the #501stLegion #CostumeClub (many of which wear stormtrooper costumes) promoting racism or harming anyone while raising millions of dollars for various charities while they’re wearing stormtrooper costumes? Again, absolutely not.
  • Are the hundreds of millions of people who have watched one or more “Star Wars” movies or animated TV shows been inspired to be racist because of “Star Wars”? That seems very unlikely.

If the organizers of the 2012 Princeton graduates reunion can prove that wearing a “Star Wars” stormtrooper costume promotes racism, then by all means ban stormtrooper costumes. Just make sure that all Imperial costumes are also banned. In fact, if “Star Wars” is so racist, why have a “Star Wars” themed party to begin with? Take our advice: don’t have a “Star Wars” themed class reunion. In fact, don’t have a theme at all because who knows what other heinous forms of racism weren’t actually ever inspired by other fantasy & science fiction genres.

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Original article (also linked above) can be found here: http://m.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/mar/1/stormtrooper-costumes-banned-from-star-wars-themed/

Attaching Rubber Soles to a Spandex Costume

DIY #costuming tutorial: attaching soles to a spandex #costume. If your #cosplay has spandex feet (like #SpiderMan), you can attach rubber soles to the bottom of the feet to make it easier to walk and protect the spandex costume itself.

Bear in mind that once you attach soles to the bottom of your spandex costume, you won’t be able to remove them without damaging the spandex, so you want to be careful how you do it.

At a minimum, the supplies that you’ll need to attach soles are as follows:

  • A pair of rubber-soled boat shoes.
  • Fabric scissors.
  • Shoe-goo (or similar glue, such as E6000, Super Glue, hot glue, Gorilla Glue)
  • A box cutter or exact-o-knife.

Basic instructions:

  1. Using the fabric scissors, carefully cut the uppers of the boat shoes from the rubber soles.
  2. Save the insoles from the boat shoes: you will need these later.
  3. Using the box cutter or exact-o-knife, carefully cut a number of lines into the top side of the rubber soles (the side that your foot will be on). Be careful not to cut all the way through to the bottom of the sole. The cut lines will help the glue to adhere to sole.
  4. Apply glue to the top side of one of the rubber soles (left or right) and spread it around.
  5. Insert the insole from the boat shoes (that you saved earlier) into the foot of your spandex costume that matches the rubber sole that you applied the glue to.
  6. Insert your feet into the spandex costume legs. Make sure that the insole is where you want it to be and that there aren’t any unwanted wrinkles or folds in the spandex fabric.
  7. Place the rubber sole onto the floor and carefully step onto it with the matching foot that has the insole inside and apply equal pressure to help bond the fabric, insole and rubber sole together. Be careful not to get the glue onto your skin.
  8. After you have waited for a while, you can try to carefully slide your foot out of the spandex costume. Place some wadded up paper into the foot and then press something heavy on top of it, like a sack of rice. You could also wrap some rubber bands around the rubber sole and top of the spandex of the foot. This will permit you to walk around while giving the glue more time to set. We recommend 24 hours.
  9. Go back to step 4 and repeat the process with the other foot. You can try starting the other foot before the 1st one is finished, but this ensures that each one will be done well.

This tutorial video by “asleeplessvision” also shows this process. There are multiple, similar “how-to” videos like this on YouTube that you can also reference: