Cosplayer Explains First-Hand Account of Recent “Cosplay Is Not Consent” Incident

#CosplayIsNotConsent: #cosplayer #AlchemicFox (check out her #YouTube channel) has published a first-hand account of how she was #groped & #punched while attending an anime con in a #Naruto #costume by a female cosplayer:

 

If you are ever inappropriately touched or attacked at a convention, report the incident immediately to the nearest convention staff, security guard or police officer.

Cosplay is never consent.

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For further reading, we have posted on this topic before:

 

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What is Fursuiting?

Of the various forms of #costuming & #cosplay, one of the forms that has a very vibrant & creative community are the #furries. Furries (or #fursuiters) are people who dress up as anthropomorphic animal characters, usually ones that they have created themselves and that may be a combination of 2 or more types of animals put together. The characters may appear like very realistic animals, but they are often very colorful and cartoonish in appearance, which makes sense because many fursuiters take inspiration from anthropomorphic animal characters from cartoons and animes.

Furries typically congregate at furry-themed conventions, though some may attend more generalized comic or anime conventions. They also have their groups and clubs where they like to get together. Their main method of communication is the Internet, with sites like Fur Affinity and many others.

Unfortunately, some cosplayers & costumers who aren’t furries don’t have positive opinions of furries; but in our opinion, these views are not justified because furries are technically no different from any other cosplayers & costumers: they design, create and wear costumes for both having fun and for charity work.

The biggest differences between furries and other costumes & cosplayers is that furries tend to emphasize the design of their own characters (as well as what furries call a “fursona”, which is the furry equivalent to a persona), while most costumers and cosplayers typically wear a costume that represents an existing character from a specific sci-fi, fantasy, superhero/super-villain, etc., franchise (or is a custom costume based on existing characters). Also, the vast majority of costumes worn by non-furry costumers & cosplayers aren’t based on a furry character. Exceptions include (but are not limited to) Chewbacca (from Star Wars), wampas (also from Star Wars), Rocket Raccoon (from Guardians of the Galaxy), etc. All of these mentioned characters are anthropomorphic characters.

If costumers & cosplayers (who don’t consider themselves to be furries) can wear furry-based costumes, so can furries. Thus, furries are just as much a part of the overall costuming & cosplay community as any other costumers & cosplayers and should always be treated as such.

If you want to know more about furries, we highly recommend viewing this student-made documentary about furries that was created for a film class in 2016. Check out the reasons that many people become furries and you’ll hear reasons that are essentially identical to why people become non-furry cosplayers & costumers.

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NY Times Interview with Costume Designer Michael Kaplan on “Star Wars VIII: The Last Jedi”

The #NYTimes interviewed #costume designer Michael Kaplan, who designed the #costumes for “#StarWars VIII: #TheLastJedi”. Michael Kaplan designed over a thousand costumes for the movie, including the Praetorian Guards, which were his favorites:

Praetorian Guard costumes from “Star Wars VIII: The Last Jedi”

He also designed costumes for the 1982 #BladeRunner and the 2015 “#StarWars VII: #TheForceAwakens”.

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Police Officer Brings Superheroes to Life for Sick Children

The #PersonOfTheWeek on tonight’s #NBCNews is Damon Cole: a Fort Worth, TX police officer who spends time visiting sick children while wearing a variety of different #superhero #cosplay #costumes, including #Batman, #Superman, #SpiderMan, #CaptainAmerica, #IronMan & more! He even wears a Superman sigil on his vest under his uniform when his duties as a police officer have him interacting with kids!

Damon Cole is a true inspiration and demonstrates to all #costumers & #cosplayers what the hobby is truly all about: giving back to the community, and we thank him for his service as a police officer and a costumed superhero for kids!

https://www.nbcnews.com/widget/video-embed/1134203459601

We also found this video from 2016 also featuring Damon Cole from the Dallas-Fort Worth CBS TV outlet:

References

Wil Wheaton Wore a “Star Trek” Costume to See “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Life imitated art Thursday (Dec. 14, 2017) when actor Wil Wheaton wore a #StarTrek #costume to a screening of “#StarWarsVIII: #TheLastJedi”! He also tweeted about it:

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Wil Wheaton dressed in a “Star Trek” costume at a “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” screening.

Wil Wheaton & friends at the “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” screening.

Wil Wheaton, who starred as Wesley Crusher in “Star Trek: #TheNextGeneration”, appears as himself regularly in the long-running sitcom #BigBangTheory, in which he did wear a “Star Trek” costume to a screening of “Star Wars VII: #TheForceAwakens”.

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$5000 Stolen from “Walking Dead” Cosplayer in New Jersey

$5000 was stolen from a professional #WalkingDead #cosplayer while at the Walker Stalker Con in Edison, NJ. The money was inside a cash box where cosplayer Cecil Garner kept his money earned while taking photos with fans on “Walking Dead” character Rick Grimes.

“It was devastating,” said Garner, who left his job as a banker in 2016 to become a professional cosplayer. Edison police are investigating and have reviewed security cameras from the convention hall.

A gofundme has been set up for Garner to help him recover from the loss.  So far over $2600 has been raised.

Anyone with information about this theft is urged to contact the Edison, NJ police department.

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Cosplaying as a Star Wars Vehicle

#StarWars #costumes & #cosplayers are rather common, but #cosplaying as a “Star War” vehicle is quite different. #Kotaku shared an article about cosplayers who dress up as “Star Wars” vehicles. Common vehicle #cosplays include an AT-AT, AT-ST, Death Star, TIE fighter & more. Below are a few examples:

AT-ST, Millennium Falcon, TIE fighter:

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AT-AT:

Another AT-ST:

Child AT-ST:

Imperial Star Destroyer:

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